TESLa Projects

Turbulence Physics and Modeling

Turbulence is an enormously complex physical phenomenon that is essentially ubiquitous in engineering and nature. At TESLa, we use numerical simulations to understand basic turbulent flow physics and, wherever possible, develop physically-accurate flow models. These models are critical for addressing many applied problems in engineering and science, including the design of advanced propulsion systems and climate modeling.

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Turbulent Combustion and Reacting Flows

Understanding the interactions between turbulence and flames is of fundamental importance in many applications, including the design of high-speed propulsion systems and gas turbine engines. At TESLa, we perform both fundamental and applied research on turbulent combustion problems with an emphasis on obtaining physical insights into turbulence-flame interactions and incorporating these insights into models of applied problems.

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Renewable Energy Systems

As marketplace and governmental restrictions on traditional fossil fuel energy sources continue to increase over the coming decades, sources of renewable and sustainable energy will form an increasingly important role in the US energy portfolio. At TESLa, we study wind and ocean renewable energy systems with a particular focus on numerical simulations of large-scale wind and ocean power plants operating in realistic environments.

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Geophysical Flows

The enomorous range of spatial and temporal scales found in most geophysical (i.e., atmospheric and oceanic) flows makes their study incredibly complex. Capturing both large and small scale turbulent processes, in particular, requires demanding numerical simulations on thousands of computer cores. At TESLa, we study physical processes in the ocean over a wide range of scales, spanning submesoscale eddies down to small-scale Langmuir turbulence. Our group also studies the evolution and properties of reactive tracers in the ocean, which has implications for ocean biogeochemistry and the global carbon cycle.

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